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Threat of dumping sludge in Worth site is removed

  • Written by Sharon L. Filkins

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has relinquished the deed for the 78-acre Lucas-Berg Preserve Site in Worth back to the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District, which will remove the threat of the site being used for the dumping of silt dredged from the Cal-Sag Channel.

Cong. Dan Lipinski (D-3rd) said this is great news for Worth. The deed was turned over from the Army Corps to the MWRD on Oct. 28.

“This is a big victory for the community of Worth and the surrounding area,” said Lipinski. “For many years it has been a priority of mine to remove Lucas-Berg as the Army Corps’ designated site for dumping dredged materials from the Cal-Sag. It was a difficult road to get this done, but it is important for me to do all I can to work with local residents and protect communities in the Third District.”

Lipinski said the final step was accomplished last year to protect the preserve by inserting language into the Water Resources Reform and Development Act in June of 2014, which stopped the Army Corps from ever being able to dump dredged materials into the preserve property.

Concern over the future of the Lucas-Berg site goes back decades to when it was privately owned and was used to excavate sand. The MWRD acquired the land in 1975, and then granted easement rights to the Army Corps’ of Engineers, which opened the door for the possible dumping of sludge into the site.

Under former Worth Mayor Randy Keller, a commission was established to fight plans for using the lake in the preserve as a dumping site. For more than 20 years, Worth has designated two days per year as “Clean-Up Day” at the preserve. For each day, the village requests a permit from the MWRD to open the gate to the site, at 111th and 76th Avenue, to allow volunteers to go in to weed and clean up the preserve.

This year, Clean-up Day was Saturday and more than 40 people showed up to walk the site and pick up and bag refuse. According to Village Clerk Bonnie Price, an estimated 100 bags of weeds and trash were gathered by the volunteers. Participants included Cub Scout Pack 3668 and Boy Scout Troop 668, Worth Park District commissioners, Worth Police Chief Mark Mizepick and Deputy Chief Chuck Kulisek, and several village officials including Mayor Mary Werner and Trustee Rich Dziedzic.

Also present were representatives of the Worth Lion’s Club. State Rep. Fran Hurley (D-35th) also stopped by.

“We also had people come from other communities this year. There were people from Palos Hills and Alsip,” said Price.

Werner said the village is interested in purchasing the property but it could be at least two years before it may be available.

“The MWRD will have to decide if it may have a corporate use for the property, and if not, it will be sold,” said Werner.

Allison Fore, public information and intergovernmental affairs officer for MWRD, agrees with Werner.

“The MWRD needs to evaluate whether it has a corporate purpose for this site,” said Fore.“ If not needed, the MWRD is required to sell the property. After this determination is made, the MWRD would move forward in selling part or all of the property. Currently, the MWRD is evaluating a local flooding issue submitted by the Village of Worth and determining whether a portion of Lucas Berg could play a role in alleviating this issue.”