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To heck with tech

  • Written by Kelly White

New Little Free Library set to bring ‘humanity back into community’

In an era of technology, Hickory Hills is takingpage-1-2-col-Little-Free-LibraryThe Little Free Library in Hickory Hills opened up last Thursday in front of City Hall. Photo by Kelly White. a step back and opening up its first Little Free Library. 

The Little Free Library, displayed outside of the Hickory Hills City Hall at 8652 W 95th Street, debuted at last Thursday’s city council meeting. The little blue schoolhouse-shaped box, decorated with watermelon decals, stands at the doors of city hall building and is filled with books for anyone to enjoy.
It’s a take-a-book-return-a-book gathering place where neighbors can share their favorite literature and stories. In its most basic form, a Little Free Library is a box full of books where anyone may stop by and pick up a book or two and bring back another book of their own to share with the community. They are also referred to as community book exchanges, book trading posts and pop-up libraries.
Described by Annette Armstrong, director of the Green Hills Library, as a do-it-yourself project, the Little Free Library is a tough competitor alongside the digital age.
“It really brings a sense of humanity back into the community,” she said at the city council meeting.
The Little Free Library belongs to everyone and you do not need a library card to have access to the books. Neighbors, friends and even people just passing by may use the library that offers a way to share physical books.
Residents are encouraged to take books, share books and give books. If a resident sees something they would like to read, they may simply take it from the Little Free Library. When finished with the book, the reader is encouraged to leave a special note inside of the paperback book so future readers can see who previously read the same book and what they thought of it.
Sharing books is also encouraged. Donating books to the library is another way local community members can contribute. Any books in your home, including books a reader would like to recommend to other readers, childhood favorites and books that teach and intrigue, can be dropped off daily at the Little Free Library.
This is the first Little Free Library in Hickory Hills, however, Mayor Mike Howley would like to open up more.
“I’ve seen the Little Free Libraries in the Oak Park community after Annette had spoken to me about the concept and I realized it is a really good idea,” he said, “People passing by them were gathering and stopping to take books.”
The Little Free Library idea was popularized in Hudson, Wisconsin in 2009 when Todd Bol mounted a wooden container designed to look like a school house on a post on his lawn as a tribute to his mother, who was a book lover and school teacher.
“These Little Free Libraries promote the love of reading and build a sense of community,” Armstrong said, “We would like to eventually add other informative pieces of information into the Little Library, as well, including newsletters and other local community information that will be beneficial to residents.”
Armstrong and members of the Green Hills Library will be visiting the Little Library outside of city hall monthly to drop off new books.
Palos Heights currently has two Little Free Libraries in their municipality, one stationed at 123rd and Harlem and one at Lake Katherine, 7402 Lake Katherine Drive.