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Plans for multi-town drainage plan underway

  • Written by Kelly White

  Palos Hills is joining forces with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District (MWRD), Cook County and two nearby communities to develop a master storm water drainage plan for a five-mile stretch of Roberts Road.

  The city joined the MWRD and representatives from Bridgeview, Hickory Hills, Justice and Cook County Highway Department last Thursday at a kick-off meeting in Palos Hills to discuss a proposed drainage plan for Roberts Road from 71st Street to 111th Street.
  But Palos Hills and Hickory Hills residents shouldn’t get too excited just yet. It could be a decade before a Roberts Road storm water system is installed, thereby resolving many of the flooding issues that affect both towns,
said Larry Boettcher, Hickory Hills’ director of public works.
  But Boettcher and Hickory Hills Mayor Mike Howley lauded the MWRD for employing a regional approach to solve the Roberts Road flooding problems, which also plague Justice and Bridgeview.
  “They’re looking at the bigger picture,” Howley said.
  Previously, individual communities examined ways to solve flooding issues, but such an approach could have a negative impact on neighboring towns, Boettcher said.
  “Engineering studies have shown the main drain under Roberts Road is undersized and drainage improvements are necessary,” Palos Hills Public Works Commissioner Dave Weakley said at last Thursday’s city council meeting.
  The MWRD and the Cook County Highway Department are addressing all concerns and working to develop a comprehensive plan that addresses the storm water drainage needs of the communities residing along Roberts Road, Weakley said.
  Meanwhile, the Palos Hills Public Works Department recently completed two water main replacement projects, Weakley said. Fifty feet of deteriorated water main was replaced at Winter Park and Sun Valley drives and another 50 feet was replaced at Cottonwood and Chestnut drives.
  “The maintenance work was in response to numerous water main failures at both locations,” Ald. Martin Kleefisch (1st Ward) said.
  Two leaks were located on 74th Avenue—one 104 Street and the other at 105th Street—were rather large and finding their way into the sanitary sewer system. The other two leaks were the result of fire hydrants that were not fully closed, Weakley said.
  Weakley reported at previous city council meetings that there was a hidden water leak in the city’s system, and a water leak detection company was brought in to survey the system and locate the leaks. Four water leaks were detected and repaired, he said.
  Weakley said his department also has responded to concerns about poor storm water drainage at 102nd Street and 78th Avenue by clearing overgrown vegetation and debris from the east ditch line along 78th Avenue from 101st Street to 102nd Street, he said.
  “After completing an elevation survey of the area, it was determined that clearing the ditch was the best approach to improving storm water conveyance throughout the area,” he said.
  During the clearing process, public works crews discovered a beaver dam in Lucas Ditch Extension, east of 78th Avenue and north of 103rd Street, which also contributed to poor storm water drainage in the area. The MWRD was contacted and trapping of the beavers was been requested.
— Bob Rakow contributed to this report