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Oak Lawn business and Girl Scouts provide Hurricane Harvey relief By Joe Boyle An Oak Lawn business and local organizations have rallied to assist the residents of southern Texas whose homes have been flooded and their lives have been turned upside down.

  • Written by Joe Boyle

 

 

An Oak Lawn business and local organizations have rallied to assist the residents of southern Texas whose homes have been flooded and their lives have been turned upside down.

The owners and staff at Pluto’s restaurant at 10341 S. Cicero Ave. have donated food and other items to the victims of Hurricane Harvey. Ownership has provided for a truck so that items can be sent to the region for people living in temporary quarters as the long process of rebuilding begins.

Teachers and students at Shepard High School in Palos Heights have been creating signs and helped in collecting supplies to donate to the Hurricane Harvey relief effort. The truck full of collected items left the school for the Houston area on Tuesday afternoon.

Shepard teacher Jennifer Glanz and her digital photography class assisted in creating signs and taking photos of the faculty and staff helping out. Parent Liaison Kim Burke and security officer Ashaunti Graves organized the drive to collect supplies to donate to Hurricane Harvey relief.

Worth Mayor Mary Werner said that local schools and organizations have raised funds and collected clothes and toiletries to provide for people who have lost everything because of the flooding.

“I know local Girl Scout troops have been collecting goods and the Lions Club in Chicago Ridge have been collecting items that have been brought to their village hall to be sent down there,” Werner said.

Donation boxes will be available in the front lobby of the Chicago Ridge Village Hall, 10455 S. Ridgeland Ave., until Sept. 11, when a truck will leave for Houston with the donations for victims of the flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey.

Oak Lawn Mayor Sandra Bury is pleased with the efforts by the staff at Pluto’s and local organizations who have stepped up to assist in the relief effort.

“Our emergency management team has been in contact with officials down there to see what can be done,” Bury said. “The main suggestion is to donate to the Red Cross and the Salvation Army. That’s been our push right now.”

St Patricia students and staff participated in a fundraising event on Aug. 30 to benefit those in need after Hurricane Harvey.

Elementary school students have also assisted in helping out since Hurricane Harvey ripped through southern Texas on Aug. 25. On Aug. 24, the students and staff at St. Patricia School in Hickory Hills arrived for classes sporting their hats, along with their generosity.

The school held their “Hats for Houston” campaign and raised over $600 to be donated to Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston.

“We are so blessed and grateful to our school for their support to the children and families who are touched by the devastation in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey,” said Jamie Nowinski, principal of St. Patricia School.

Flooding is still a problem in certain communities of Houston. Port Arthur, Katy and Beaumont have also been hit hard by the flooding waters that in some cases range from four feet to 10 feet. Bennett said that as Texas slowly recovers from this calamity, more storms could hit another region of the U.S.

Residents who would like to donate to the Hats for Houston cause can contact catholiccharities.org and make their personal donation.