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Rush among local Dems to be re-elected

  • Written by Dermot Connolly

While Donald Trump won the presidential election in a nail-biter early Wednesday morning, one of the few local contested races was in the 1st Congressional District, where Cong. Bobby Rush easily fended off a second challenge from Republican August (O’Neill) Deuser, who also ran against him in 2014.

With 96 percent of the totals in, Rush was elected to his 13th term in Congress with 74 percent of the votes (220,462) to 26 percent (79,171) for Deuser. The heavily Democratic district, which stretches from the South Side of Chicago to Will County, takes in all or parts of Evergreen Park, Oak Lawn, Worth, Palos Heights and Orland Park along the way.

Deuser, a retired teacher from Mokena, said he knew he was in for a difficult fight.

“I was clearly the underdog, but I beat him in Will County,” said Deuser, where unofficial results show he received 67.2 percent of the votes. In the suburban Cook County part of the district, Rush received 53.9 percent of votes (46,752) to 46.1 percent (39,955) for Deuser, who called the district “gerrymandered by Michael Madigan.”

In the 3rd District, incumbent Cong. Dan Lipinski had no challengers listed on the ballot. However, Diane Harris, a Republican, registered as a write-in candidate. But it was no surprise that he won nearly 100 percent of the vote with 212,148. Write-in votes were only tallied in Will County, where 1,417 were recorded.

“I’m honored to be re-elected again, I was out at a lot of polling places today and heard a lot of good comments,” said Lipinski. “It is not a surprise that the Republicans retained control of the House and the Senate, but their majorities will be smaller,” said Lipinski. “We’re a divided nation in many ways and we need to heal,” said Lipinski.

“I’m just going to continue to do what I have been doing for 12 years. I look for issues that I can bring people together get things done.

“We still need to get a funding bill passed to get us through next September. So we have a lot of work ahead of us when we return to Washington,” said Lipinski, who hopes that the new president supports a comprehensive transportation infrastructure bill when the new term starts in January.

“I just hope President Obama does not try to get the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement passed during the lame-duck session,” said Lipinski, an early opponent of the agreement between the United States and several countries in Asia, which he believes would harm U.S. industries.

“I really hope that does not happen, with 50 people leaving Congress. It would really look like the system is rigged.”

Incumbent state Rep. Frances Hurley (D-35th) is the only local state legislator in a contested race this year. The 35th District stretches from Ashland Avenue in Chicago, as far west as Will-Cook Road, taking in parts of Evergreen Park, Oak Lawn, Chicago Ridge, Palos Park, Palos Heights and Orland Park.

And she was victorious in her bid for a third term in office. With 94 percent of ballots counted, she easily beat Republican challenger Victor Horne by a margin of 65 percent (31,488 votes) to 35 percent (17, 249). Horne, an ordained minister and Army veteran of the Vietnam War, also ran against her in 2014.

The local incumbent legislators who ran unopposed for re-election on Tuesday included state. Sen. Michael Hastings (D-19th), whose district includes parts of Orland Park and Orland Township, and state Sen. Jacqueline Collins (D-16th). Her district includes parts of Oak Lawn, Hickory Hills and Palos Hills. Other local legislators who were unopposed included state representatives Monique Davis (D-27th), Mary Flowers (D-31st), Andre Thapedi (D-32nd) and Kelly Burke (D-36th). The suburban sections of their districts are divided between Evergreen Park, Oak Lawn, Hickory Hills, Worth, Palos Heights, Palos Hills, Palos Park and Orland Park.

Hastings and Burke both said recently that following the election, their focus would be on resolving the budget impasse in Springfield, which has been going on for two years. Hastings said numerous social service programs have been adversely affected by the inability to approve a budget, and Burke said it has jeopardized public colleges and universities also. They maintain that Gov. Bruce Rauner is making the process more difficult by insisting on making his “turnaround” part of budget negotiations.

Farther down the ballots, three Democrats also were elected to six-year terms on the Cook County Metropolitan Water Reclamation District: incumbents Barbara McGowan and Marijana Spyropoulos, and newcomer Josina Morina. Martin Durkan, another Democrat, also was elected to a two-year term on the MWRD.

Despite all the division among voters in the hard-fought presidential race, it looks like people of all stripes got behind the statewide referendum asking if the state constitution should be amended to require that all transportation-related taxes and fees be used only for roads, bridges, and other transportation-related costs.

Statewide, the binding referendum won with 79 percent (3,690,927) to 21 percent (985,245). In suburban Cook County, with all precincts reporting, the percentages were nearly identical: 79.75 percent for yes (710,358) and 20.25 percent for no (180,355 votes).